MAE Projects

Advanced Combustion: Hot Air Balloon-Engineering

MAE

The purpose of this project is to research and develop a functional testing facility and testing methods for the UltraMagic MK-32 burner. Our end goal is to understand the combustion behavior of the burner, its emissions, and efficiency for future optimization of the burner anatomy.

This functional testing facility will include the design and manufacturing of a ducting and fan/pump system to provide excess air that would naturally exist in a hot air balloon and allow a constant flow of emissions to measure with a gas analyzer. This modification system will be attached to the existing testing rig. Another needed addition to the facility is the permanent structure and position for the burner and propane. A structure needs to be designed to allow constant testing positioning of the burner to reduce variability and allow a safe distance for propane to not be in the range of heat radiation.

Anteater Baja Racing (Baja SAE)

MAE

The UCI Baja SAE team competes yearly in the Baja SAE West Collegiate Design Competition hosted by the Society of Automotive Engineers.  Each year the team develops a brand-new single-seat off-road vehicle for the competition based on research into the dynamics of off-road vehicles and a critical analysis of the previous year’s car. The yearly competition hosts 100 collegiate teams from across the world and consists of a series of static and dynamic events culminating in the 4-hour, 100 car wheel-to-wheel endurance event.

Anteater Electric Racing - FSAE EV at UC Irvine

MAE

Anteater Electric Racing is an Engineering Design Project consisting of Mechanical, Aerospace, Electrical and Computer Engineers tasked to design, build and test a Formula SAE Electric Racecar. The team of 60 Engineers will enter their 2020 Ampeater Racecar into the Formula SAE California  at the Auto Club Speedway in Fontana this June againt 110 other universities. At the Winter Design Review, the team will display their built Racecar for review and will be excited to present the specifications of this year's build. 

Anteater Formula Racing (FSAE Internal Combustion)

Anteater Formula Racing's 2019 Racecar on the Endurance track at Formula SAE Lincoln 2019
MAE

Anteater Formula Racing builds an open-wheel, internal-combustion race car inspired by Formula 1 and IndyCar racing to compete at Formula SAE California, a world-renowned collegiate vehicle design competition that challenges project engineers to maximize vehicle performance, validate their design choices and methods, and develop professional presentation skills. Forty-five engineering students participate in the design, manufacturing and testing phases to gain the engineering skills needed for industry in a highly-technical, fast-paced and competitive environment. The team collectively spends over 10,000 man-hours each year developing the car and its subsystems alongside engineering coursework.

Autonomous Systems: Data Transfer Buoy

MAE

Transferring data wirelessly is never fully secured and creating a hardwire connection is the best manner to preventing that data from being intercepted. The Autonomous Systems: Data Transfer Buoy offers an innovative method in establishing a secure data hub while out at sea. Rather than sending unmanned vessels back to land each time they are done with a mission they are able to save time by instead traveling to the nearest data buoy hub. Here they can exchange all necessary data through a hardwired connection making it a secure method that saves both time and money.

Autonomous Systems: Mobile Simulated Buoy Hub

MAE

The Mobile Simulated Buoy Hub project is run out of UCI's ASPIN Lab (Autonomous Systems Perception, Intelligence, & Navigation) and is associated with the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Corona, CA. Members are challenged with designing an autonomous buoy to navigate to a fixed waypoint where data transfer will occur with another vessel. The buoy will also communicate wirelessly with HQ on shore and serve as a file hub that can be accessed remotely. The project has both mechanical and electrical components and allows students to practice the engineering design process from start to finish.

Autonomous Systems: Unmanned Floating Vehicle

MAE

 

Background

As part of the UC Irvine Autonomous System, students will be in charge of designing and testing a floating vessel that will be able to autonomously navigate through the sea. The vessel will be going to sea unmanned in order to provide updated cyber security patches against new threats. The vehicle has to attach to a buoy and make a physical data connection to a high bandwidth port in order to upload new security patches and receive updated coordinates for its next mission.

Goals & Objectives

Cargo Plane

MAE

UCI Cargo Plane participates in the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Aero Design West Competition. This competition provides engineering students exposure to real-life engineering challenges in the aerospace industry. The goal is to create a bush plane design that can operate from short runways while carrying outsized cargo. Students are expected to perform trade studies to find a design solution that will optimally meet the mission requirements. The types of payload these aircraft are required to hold are soccer balls and steel plates. During the competition, teams are expected to load and unload soccer balls and steel plates in under a minute. For this reason, the design should account for easy loading accessibility. These design factors test the team’s ability to exercise time management, stay within budget, and ultimately build a plane to meet the goals of the competition.

CubeSat

UCI CubeSat Logo
MAE

The goal of UCI CubeSat is to design, test, integrate, and launch a modular microsatellite using the CubeSat standard into low-Earth orbit in conjunction with Professor Rafique, Professor Kassas, and the ASPIN lab at UCI to test multiple payloads in orbit. Our team hopes to be the first student launch at UCI, creating a standard for future student launches and orbital research at UCI.

Design Build Fly

MAE

Design Build Fly is an annual international competition hosted by AIAA and Cessna/Raytheon. The goal is to design and build a plane that abides by the year's rules while also performing the best at the competition. The competition will take place in Wichita, Kansas in mid-April. This year the theme of the competition is to build an aerial advertising plane. Specific requirements include being able to deploy, carry, and release a large banner and carry passengers with their luggage.

EDI: Hybrid Renewable Energy System

MAE

Sustainability is an increasingly important consideration for engineers throughout the world. With the increases in global temperature, engineers are looking at renewable energy generation to combat climate change. California has already enacted the SB-100 Renewables Portfolio Standard Program, which is attempting to transition 100% of California’s electricity to renewable sources by 2045 (SB100).  Solar and Wind Energy are essential components in this fight against climate change. Current utility based renewable energy production demands vast investment in land and capital while inducing irreversible damage to the ecosystem. On the other hand, The Hybrid Renewable Energy System (HRES) aims to reduce land use while it addresses the growing demand in renewable energy.

 

Flapping-Wing Micro Air Vehicle (FWMAV)

FWMAV Quadflapper UAV Drone
MAE

Our project aims to develop a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) that derives its thrust and stability from flapping wing mechanisms, as we explore the unconventional lift generation that makes such flight possible. The research-focused side of our project is the Systems Identification Team, which is responsible for investigating the flow field generated by flapping wing mechanisms as well as the thrust they generate. Meanwhile, the Quadflapper Team works to apply this knowledge to perform experiments on, develop, and optimize air vehicles that utilize flapping wings as their sole form of propulsion.

Flight Simulation Chair

MAE

The Flight Simulation Chair is a robotic project with the objective of simulating the experience of flying a fighter jet. The project is controlled by one Arduino Mega 2560 microcontroller, two pneumatic pistons constantly supplied at 50 psi of compressed air, and moves in two degrees of freedom (roll and pitch). The unique feature of this project is its option of playstyle: Remote Control (RC) and Virtual Reality (VR). For more information, please see the full description on the project page.

Fuel Cell Drone

MAE

Background

New forms of renewable energy have surfaced in the past years.Hydrogen fuel cells are a form of renewable energy that is easily accessible since hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, and do not cause pollution or danger to our environment as they do not release greenhouse gases as opposed to burning fossil fuels.The fuel cell drone project uses a fuel cell battery as a source of power for a flying robot that can be remotely controlled or fly autonomously through software-controlled flight. 

High Heat Flux Thermal Management

Thermal Management
MAE

The primary objective of the High Heat Flux project is to design, develop, and fabricate a thermal management
system capable of producing and dissipating high heat fluxes/loads exceeding 500 W/ cm^2. University of California, Irvine, Mechanical and Aerospace undergraduate students are tasked to designing and building a thermal system capable of generating and dissipating high heat fluxes. Currently, our system consists of a copper rod, a vacuum chamber, thermocouples, LN2, and a cooling system we are in the process of designing.

HydroCube

MAE

HydroCube is a electrolysis device that can be connected to a residential solar pannel system in order to convert and store any excess electricity in the form of hydrogen. Currently when a homes battery is full the rest of the electricity produced by the photovoltaic cells is not stored and therefore is wasted. With stored hydrogen we could begin to explore the posibility of using hydrogen in a residential setting or to power a generator to feed back to the battery when there is low sun coverage. 

HyperXite

MAE

Established in 2015, HyperXite is a team of undergraduate students endeavoring to build a Hyperloop pod.

HyperXite has competed in the past four Spacex Hyperloop Pod Competitions. In Competition I, HyperXite was one of the semifinalists and placed fifth for their overall design worldwide. Additionally, the HyperXite pod was one of the only air levitated pods to be tested within the Hyperloop itself during Competition II and placed in the top 6. In the past two competitions, HyperXite was one of the top 22 finalists to attend comeptition in Hawthorne, CA.  

This year, HyperXite will not be attending the SpaceX Hyperloop pod competition but will instead build a small-scale pod to be tested on the team's own test track. 

Intelligent Ground Vehicle

MAE

As part of the UC Irvine Intelligent Ground Vehicle team, students will be in charge of designing and testing a vehicle that will be able to autonomously navigate through an obstacle course for participation in the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC).

The IGVC is a competition that sets an automated vehicle through an obstacle course to reach the final destination utilizing obstacle avoidance sensors, algorithms, and mechanical assembly. The competition challenges engineers and strengthens their skills by being able to build a self-automated vehicle that can complete the course. The Intelligent Ground Vehicle encompasses the very latest technologies impacting industrial development including intelligent transportation systems, military applications, and manufacturing. 

LIBRA

MAE

Introduction

Aeronautics, Dynamics, and Control Laboratory (ADCL) is an  interdisciplinary lab focusing on the modeling and analysis using the rigorous mathematical tools of both Geometric Control Theory and Unsteady Aerodynamics to develop non-intuitive new engineering applications. ADCL developed new control algorithm which enables the airplane to achieve high rolling maneuverability in stall. This new rolling algorithm will solve a challenging problem in the aerospace industry, where Airplanes lose the rolling controllability in stall.

Proprioception Trainer

MAE

The Proprioception Trainer Team is focused on developing a device that can be used to retrain finger proprioception post-stroke. For the fall quarter, the team focused on animating the existing robot by focusing on the “brain” of the device. The team developed the programming of the device to control the actuators. Additionally, the team worked on the implementation of a game that motivates the user to continue using the device. The current device was already developed, therefore the team only focused on writing the programming on Python to be implemented on the Raspberry Pi. The device moves the user’s middle and index fingers and the user has to determine when they cross by strictly using proprioception.

Robotics Outreach Project (ROP)

Robotics Outreach Project (ROP)
MAE

The focus of this project is to design and build a robotics kit that introduces and is inclusive to students typically underrepresented in STEM to engineering.
To achieve this, students will design a cost-effective robotics kit that incorporates many introductory level features and an evidence-based curriculum that a middle/high schooler can safely construct with assistance.

 

Rocket Project

MAE

The UC Irvine Rocket Project aims to push the boundaries of collegiate rocketry and the development of liquid propellant rockets. Our project strives to prepare students for successful careers in the aerospace and defense industry. In 2017, Base 11 became a partner of the UCI Rocket Project. Their gracious donation enabled the construction of our rocket lab. During the Fall quarter of 2019, the team has scheduled and completed a successful static test fire to experimentally verify our first engine design. An experimental combustion test is a critical first step in designing a full rocket system as well more efficient, higher performance engines.

Solar Car: ZotSun

MAE

The SolEaters are a group of engineerings that have to design, construct, and raise funds for a fully powered solar racecar that surmounts the scrutineering process of the Formula Sun Grand Prix. After finishing that process, we will then be allowed to go to the American Solar Challenge, a cross-country endurance race for solar cars around the world. As the first established solar car team at UCI, we hope to build a solid foundation for a solar racing team that will continue to not only engineer sustainable vehicles but also help spread the importance of renewable energy for years to come.

Spacecraft Thermal Management Systems

ChEMS
MAE

Spacecraft Thermal Management Systems (STMS) is an undergraduate, interdisciplinary research/design project that works to develop an electrochromic cell for space applications for Cube and Nano Satellites. This device will act as a method of controlling heat from going into and out of the satellite through a color change, which affects how much heat is being let in. Such spacecraft are not exposed to a constant heat flux from the sun as a result of low Earth orbit. This device is special since the amount of color change can be modified to let in the proper amount of heat necessary for the spacecraft to operate.

The device works through a redox reaction pairing of nickel oxide and tungsten trioxide based films. When electrons are removed from each film, the nickel oxide will color to a dark brown and the tungsten trioxide will bleach to a clear coloration. Similarly, when electrons are added to each film, the nickel oxide will bleach to a clear coloration and the tungsten trioxide will darken to a blue coloration. When these thin films are combined, both pairs will either darken or bleach at the same time, forming the device.

Tensegrity Wing

MAE

Tensegrity utilizes adjustable tension among one-dimensional interacting members in order to create different three dimensional structures. This project aims to create the first morphinig wing at UCI.. The wing will be able to change airfoil shape on demand, in order to produce more efficient aerodynamic properties based on flight sections (takeoff, cruise, and landing). 3D printed models of the different airfoils created by the wing will be tested in UCI's wind tunnels to verify results of more efficient lift, drag, and pressure distributions than conventional wings. 

Touch Trainer

MAE

The purpose of ReTouch is to create a device that assists post-stroke patients to regain their sense of touch. The device contains two modules, where one module moves the patients’ index, middle, and ring fingers on their paralyzed hand and the other contains buttons allowing them to use their healthy hand to press and match the fingers that are being pushed. The device additionally contains a musical game corresponding to activity done on the modules to improve patients’ sense of touch over time.  

UAV Forge

UAV Forge Logo
EECS
MAE

UAV Forge is a multidisciplinary engineering senior design project with a focus on designing, building and programming unmanned aerial vehicles. Our goal this academic year is to travel to Maryland to compete in the 18th annual Student Unmanned Aerial Systems Competition (SUAS) hosted by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI). The competition is held in Webster Naval Air Station, in Patuxent River, MD, from June 17th to 20th.

UC Irvine Solar Airplane

MAE

UC Irivne Solar Airplane composes of 20-25 undergraduate mechanical and aerospace engineering students who strive to research and design an unmanned air vehicle (UAV) with solar panels completely from scratch.  The UAV will use solar energy to extend the flight time by at least 15% for disaster relief efforts where accessibility is difficult for humans or visibility is limited. The team aims to achieve this goal by utilizing a GPS and camera that will relay constant feedback back to the team during the duration of the flight. 

UCI CanSat

MAE

CanSat is an international design-build-fly competition where student teams build a probe (the CanSat) to complete a specified mission.
The CanSat is a science payload enclosed in a container. It is launched to 700 meters and must land safely. Initially, the payload and container descend under a parachute. At 400 meters, the payload and container separate. The container continues under the parachute, while the science payload deploys its delta glider to fly in a helical trajectory for 1 minute. At about 100 meters, the science payload will deploy its own parachute and fall to the ground. During all portions of the mission, the CanSat is recording environmental data from onboard sensors and streaming it in real time to a ground station computer.

Wear A Thermoelectric Calorie Harvester (WATCH)

MAE

Most of the energy leaves our bodies in the form of heat simply due to existing temperature gradients in the environment. An average human body at rest emits about 350,000 J of energy per hour, which is roughly equivalent to the energy given off by a 100-Watts incandescent light bulb. As a matter of fact, the conversion of human-body-heat into electrical energy using a solid-state thermoelectric generator (TEG) sparks interest in creating wearable self-powered mobile electronics and sensors. We, the UCI W.A.T.C.H team, which stands for "Wear A Thermoelectric Calorie Harvester," are dedicated to designing wearable thermoelectric devices powered by human body heat!