Projects

EDI Whoopy Wipes

MAE

Whoopy Wipes is a project aimed to create a device that delivers warm and santized towelettes to the user. This devices utilizes a tray to dispense wipes, and an internal heating and pumping system to heat a cleaning solution of your choice to 165 degrees Farenheit. The solution is then sent to an ejection try to wet the wipes for the user.

Goal and Objectives:

Horizontal Stepping Robot

MAE

The Horizontal Stepping Robot is a rehabilitation tool that will allow researchers to study epidural electrical stimulation (EES), with the aim of allowing patients with spinal cord injury to regain the ability to walk. The robot will be rolled up to the patient's bed, allowing for training while the patient is still hospitalized, and support the weight of their legs to allow an “air stepping” motion. It will record the patient leg motion and allow for tracking of the patient's progress through rehabilitation. The current approach is to use pulleys, springs, and cables to design a passive system that hangs patients' legs and assists leg motion while using the microprocessor, Arduino, to collect data and attract the motion of patients' legs.

Human Powered Vehicle Competition at UCI

MAE

We are a team of UCI undergraduate engineers working under ASME@UCI. HPVC is an annual senior design project whose goal is to build an innovative human-powered electric bike for the national Human Powered Vehicle Competition hosted by a national organization, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. As lower-classmen we yearned to get onto the coveted senior design projects but lacked the experience necessary. This desire served as inspiration for ASME to get the project started. Here we  provide the opportunity and encourage engineers from all backgrounds and all standings to get involved and gain hands-on senior design project experience!

MAE 189 Novel Actuator for Drones using EPMs

MAE

Our project is centered around an electro-permanent magnet(EPM), that ultimately can be implemented into two main iterations. The function of an EPM is to have a switchable magnet, within a nonswitchable magnet, that can have the direction of its magnetic field be switched by the input of a set current. In a larger scale application, this EPM can be incorporated with a bellow and thus when the magnetic field is switched a resulting pull force or push force of a spring would insinuate. The goal is to have the on setting of the switchable magnet induce an outward push force from a spring, and thus create force/motion just by supplying current. With the bellow, this EPM could be incorperated with artificial movement. 

Portable Shoulder Exercise Device

MAE

We are a team of undergraduate Engineering students that are working towards the common goal of improving people's quality of life. Our team's objective is to design and build a portable shoulder exercise device that is capable of rehabilitating the patient's shoulder muscle. Ultimately, we want the patients to be able to perform tasks that require overhead movement and extension of the elbow. Our device will be used by patients and physical therapists at the UCI Medical Center. We hope our device aids the needs of those with impaired shoulders and potentially improves the healing process and the long-term mobility of their arms.

Robot for Executing Physics Inspired Path Planned

Path Follower
MAE

  According to many route planning methods in the available literature, the Robot that we are going to create will follow the path precisely  while avoiding probable obstacles. We must discover strategies for finite-dimensional optimizations, in which the ideal path is formed by discrete optimal points. Using the calculus of variations, the Path Follower we will create directly builds the perfect path with the fewest steps. Additionally, it will be able to implement the essential control inputs that the pathfinder scheme specifies. As a proof of concept, an obstacle-oriented map of the environment is first constructed in this offline phase. Control inputs are then transmitted to the robot so that the Path Follower can carry out the command precisely.

Rocket Project Liquid CO2 Ejection System

MAE

The purpose of this project is to give the UCI Rocket Project Team a new consistent CO2 Ejection System for the recovery of the rocket that will be used for the Preliminary Test Rocket (PTR).  Students will be able to manufacture and develop the system “in-house” and can easily be manufactured to align with the project guidelines. From past designs of the recovery systems and the familiarity of the current rocket, students will be able to pursue more knowledge among higher altitudes with a CO2 Ejection Systems and implement more efficient and cleaner solutions to initiate the recovery process. With ongoing experimentations, students have the opportunity to integrate and improve their knowledge from the future systems of CO2 Ejection to reach higher altitudes in the near future.

Small Scale Wind Turbine

MAE

Renewable energy remains to be a sustainable source, exhibiting benefits such as low environmental impact and ability to be naturally replenished. SCWT Design sets out to reintroduce the utilization of wind energy by creating a small-scale portable wind turbine that demonstrates practicality for camping applications. The focuses, placed on portability and functionality, draw to a design which demonstrate capabilities for providing electrity for ordinary charging portable appliances in a camping setting (2 cell phones, camera battery charger, flashlight, backup battery bank). SCWT Design, consisting of 5 members, plans to utilize the engineering process to produce a design feasible to meet the forementioned capabilities.

Small Scale Wind Turbine

MAE

Integrating renewable energy sources into everyday life is of paramount importance to a self-sustainable world. The Fall 2022 Small Scale Wind Turbine (SCWT) is a project that will design a portable wind turbine that harnesses wind as a natural resource to power devices. Prioritizing portability and efficiency, our turbine is designed to power camping appliances with a single overnight charge. Our design will be lightweight, cost-efficient, and easily accessible to display its practicality in camping situations. The SCWT project consists of designing and manufacturing processes to produce a turbine designed to meet engineering standards. 

Small Scale Wind Turbine

MAE

With the deplenishing supply of fossil fuels, worsening consequences of pollution, and rising need demand for energy, engineers have sought for alternative means of sustaining our modern lifestyle. Wind turbines have proven to be a valuable source of renewable energy across the world as they can harness natural forces while minimizing the negative effects on the environment. We seek to apply this technology on a local scale by designing and planning the manufacture of minature wind turbines for use by campers. Our goal is to create a convenient portable vertical wind turbine that is small enough to be carried in a backpack, assemblable by few people in the wilderness, and capable of charging multiple electronic devices overnight.

Smart Pill Container

Smart Pill Container
EECS

The purpose of the Smart Pill Container is to assist consumers with taking pills on time and keep record when they do take them successfully. Our product achieves that by having an alarm system to alert the user that it’s time to take their pills; we then check if the correct day on the pill box has successfully been opened and closed using reed switch sensors. Both those parts currently work and are the base functionalities for the prototype right now.

Steerable Mechanical Walker

MAE

The goal of the Fall 2022 Steerable Mechanical Walker project is to design and build a walking machine with an advanced leg system, a single drive motor for movement, and a single servo motor for steering. The design will be remotely controlled, and should allow the walker to move 1.5 ft/s and follow a circle of 6ft diameter. The team has to provide digital and physical models of two prototypes with test data and demonstration videos with it.

Sustainability Decathlon - Domestic Hot Water for a Sustainable ADU

MAE

Background

Domestic Hot Water for a Sustainable ADU is an undergraduate design project for Sustainability Decathlon (OCSD23) which is a collegiate design-and-build competition held in Orange County focused on sustainable housing. It challenges university teams to design and build model solar-powered homes that address climate change and California’s housing needs.

Sustainability Decathlon - HVAC and Thermal Storage for a Sustainable ADU

MAE

This team is responsible for the design of an affordable and efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system appropriate for an Accessory Dwelling Unit in a low-income neighborhood of Orange County. In addition to HVAC, the team is to determine if a thermal storage system is feasible given project requirements and constraints. This engineering subteam is part of the larger UCI and Orange Coast College partnership team competing in the Orange County Sustainability Decathlon. 

Sustainability Decathlon Efficient Water Usage and Recycling

MAE

The intention of this project is to design affordable water recycling, saving, and bioremediation systems to increase the economic efficiency of water use, and to educate people who live in several ADUs about certain positive habits for saving water. We are not considering the complicated structure to merely elevate the purity of recycled water as much as we can, but to develop a comprehensive plan to save the cost of water from recycling and education. The team is focusing on several fields to accomplish the common goal. The bioremediation system uses a physical filtration device to purify the water to a certain level that meets California Legal standards for two primary purposes, toilet flushing and irrigation. The smart system detects and further filtrates the grey water. And to help the people who live in the ADU develop good habits of using water, physical barriers to wasting water are vital. These physical barriers will not lower the quality of life for these people, but help them to develop good habits. Our intention is to decrease the cost and generate a humanized system to help people and maybe help the world with the decreasing freshwater source condition in the future.

UAV Forge

EECS
MAE

UAV Forge is a multidisciplinary engineering design team that focuses on the design, manufacturing, programming and testing of autonomous aerial vehicles. The design aims to fulfill the constraints that allows the team to participate in the AUVSI SUAS 2021-2022 competition season. The AUVSI competition requires that the system’s UAV have autonomous flight capabilities, ability to perform object avoidance of stationary and dynamic objects, the ability to do object detection, localization, and classification. The system must also perform an airdrop task wherein UAV Forge will be manufacturing an assembly that will allow the UAV to drop payloads that safely land on designated targets. Though the emphasis for this year’s team is to perform well in the competition setting, the primary objective is to ensure the undergraduate students participating in the project apply their engineering skills to a compelling real-world problem.

UCI CubeSat

EECS
MAE

The CubeSat team at UCI is a student-led effort to launch a 2U nanosatellite into orbit to test two UCI research payloads. The satellite operates with five subsystems (Power/Payload, Communications, Avionics, Structures/Thermal, and Systems Engineering), in addition to housing two payloads. 

BACKGROUND:

UCI CubeSat - Antenna Deployment Mechanism

MAE

This project aims to create a compact, lightweight, and highly reliable antenna deployment mechanism that will be attached to an Orbital 2U CubeSat satellite. It must survive launch and orbital conditions and allow data to be relayed from the CubeSat to the ground station at UCI. We must ensure that we design a working mechanism that fits within the limited space provided to us on the 2U CubeSat. The antenna has to be the correct length for the material used to provide the needed frequency. We work alongside UC Irvine’s Cubesat team to verify design requirements and ensure that our designed mechanism will be compatible with the team’s CubeSat which will be launched onboard a third-party launch provider when complete. 

UCI CubeSat Solar Panel Deployment Device

MAE

Background:

The Solar Panel Deployment project aims to design a functional deployment mechanism for the solar panels on the 2U satellite from the UCI CubeSat team. The goal is to design, manufacture, and test a prototype version of the deployment device to be used on the CubeSat team's satellite. 

Objectives:​

UCI Design, Build, Fly 2022-2023

MAE

AIAA Design, Build, Fly is a national competition held annually for colleges to design and build a remote control aircraft. The theme for this year’s competition is electronic warfare, where our design team, named the UCI Aerial Anteaters, will maximize the transportation range of an electronics payload and antenna. Until competition day in April, our team will design the aircraft to ensure each mission is successful while maximizing the number of points received. This year's missions include carrying an electronic payload for an endurance run, as well as attaching an antenna to the end of the aircraft’s wing to simulate a jamming antenna. This team consists of students from all year levels working to design and fabricate an aircraft for this competition.

UCI Rocket Project - Composite Winder

MAE

The UCI rocket project seeks a method to create custom rocket tubes in-house rather than outsourcing designs to third party providers. Additionally, commercial off-the-shelf rocket tubes for various diameters are costly or not available to meet specific requirements developed by the rocket project. Therefore, the 189 composite winder team will work to develop a composite winder system capable of directly and accurately applying composite fibers onto metal mandrels, pressure vessels (such as fuel and oxidizer tanks), and rocket tube skins varying from three to eleven inches in diameter. Composite materials are preferred for this project due to their high strength to weight capabilities which serves as a reinforcement to existing rocket skins and pressure vessels during high stress flight. The overall system aims to be constructed with a total budget of $800 utilizing components that are commercially available, if components must be custom manufactured, they should be simple to machine.  

UCI Spacecraft Thermal Management Systems

CBE
MAE

Research Mission: The goal of Spacecraft Thermal Management Systems (STMS) is to be developing several Variable Emissivity Device prototypes, or VEDs, one of which is to be applied as payload to a CubeSat and launched into Low-Earth Orbit. This VED will mitigate thermal loads from the sun and internal satellite electronics and offers a low-cost thermal control solution to absorb or reject heat from spacecraft. We work closely with the UCI CubeSat project to coordinate the VED and satellite operations. 

Validation of XFOIL for 2D Airfoils

MAE

The project's aim is to test and validate XFOIL, a numerical analysis tool that calculates the lift and drag forces experienced by 2D airfoil shapes. The goal of this team is to design and execute an experimental campaign to acquire reliable data for the validation of XFOIL's numerical prediction method.  The campaign involves a set of carefully coordinated wind tunnel experiments and numerical calculations to document methods and results.  With the application of the acquired data, XFOIL’s predictability is assessed through the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) framework adapted to assess modeling and simulation methods.

Walking Support for Improved Mobility and Independence

Team Logo
MAE

The elderly commonly rely on canes and walkers for balance and gait support. Similarly, crutches are commonly used after injury. All of these devices are cumbersome, force unnatural gait patterns, and greatly limit their arms. Several exoskeleton designs have been proposed in research, but they tend to be heavy and actively controlled (i.e. with motors). They also are difficult to don and doff, which does not make them very user friendly. The goal of this project is to design a passive (or semi-active) lower-limb assistive device that will provide moderate support to users during gait, while not restricting arm use.

World’s Smallest Autonomous Aquatic Robot for Emerging Contaminant Detection (REMORUS)

MAE

From the time a creature is first born, food is the number one priority for its survival. Locating and capturing its food effectively is crucial, and in robotics this process is called foraging. Our goal is to develop the smallest functional aquatic autonomous robot capable of finding a power source to recharge. Remorus must swim autonomously in water and return back to its charging station before the battery runs out of charge. Potential applications of such technology include swarms of such robots performing various tasks. Several colleges and universities have designed their own micro Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV), like MIT’s Blue Bot and Harvard’s RoboBees which demonstrate the capabilities of robot swarms. The project may act as a proof of concept for future aquatic micro-robots and demonstrate the possibility of using AUV swarms to detect water contaminants and enter the human body to perform procedures.